GM Transgene Corn Infiltrates South African Seed Supply

GM Transgene Corn Infiltrates South African Seed Supply
Farming/Crops

Remember that unsavory consequence that experts warned about whereby genetically engineered ‘trans’ genes cross-pollinate non-GM types to cause a literal war on our food supply? Well it has happened again in South Africa.

Biotech companies have come up with all sorts of ridiculous reasons for using trans-gene technology, without a modicum for concern about containing those genes once they are let loose into the world – or perhaps this was their intention all along. Now, in yet another case of unwanted cross-contamination between GM and Non-GM seed, GM corn transgenes have penetrated the informal seed supplies of smallholder farmers in the Eastern Cape, South Africa.

As reported by SustainablePulse:

“A first study of its kind has found that GM maize transgenes have penetrated the informal seed supplies of smallholder farmers in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. The study screened for transgenes in external fields, home gardens and local household seed holdings in a village where GM insect-resistant maize had been previously grown from 2001–2008 and also analysed the seed management practices of farmers there.”

South Africa currently has over 2.3 million hectares of GM crops planted, 78% of which are insect-resistant and/or herbicide-tolerant maize. In short – they were made to withstand Monsanto’s poison chemicals – the very same concoction that is producing cytotoxic disease in humans in every conceivable non-industry sponsored study conducted.

What the researchers found should be no surprise since GM Maize is grown in such close proximity to other non-GM maize varieties, but the frequency of contamination is concerning:

Researchers found that the commonly used transgene promoter p35s occurred in one of the 796 maize leaf samples (0.0013%) and in five of the 20 seed batch samples (25%). Three of the five included herbicide-tolerant maize (NK603) while the remaining two included genes for insect resistance (from MON810).”

A fourth of all tested samples contained GM transgenes meant for herbicide resistance.

You can bet biotech is happy about this – it means they can sue more farmers for patent infringement, and overtake another local seed supply, monopolizing farmer’s crops once again. It also poses an enormous threat to the eco-system, and contaminates organic seed.

Unfortunately, once these GMO creations are unleashed, they can not be stopped or recalled. One report finds that the GMO contamination issue is much more serious than previously thought, and the concerned experts couldn’t be more correct.

Maybe these farmers should try suing biotech instead for contaminating their seed supply. It didn’t work in the US, but maybe South African judges aren’t as money-tied.