pomegranateIt seems as though Mother Nature left us many clues on the healing power of foods. Many healing foods actually look like the organs they protect—with walnuts resembling tiny brains, and avocados resembling the womb—many natural foods tell a lot by looks alone. The pomegranate is no different, with its separated chambers and blood red flesh appearance, this fruit is great for promoting – you guessed it – heart health.

Pomegranates have an astringent effect. As GreenMedInfo.com describes, the same sort of puckering and drying feeling in your mouth when eating a pomegranate is experienced by your heart. “When you feel that amazing cleansing effect in your mouth, this is in fact akin to what your circulatory system…’feels’ as well.”

But this isn’t just something that is felt and assumed by the shape of a fruit; this is something that has been proven in a controlled, scientific environment.

In one experiment, researchers studied the effects of pomegranate juice in both healthy men and mice. They found that daily supplementation with the juice had significant effects on reducing plaque in the artery walls, and reduced oxidative stress.

Another study looked at 10 patients with atherosclerosis and measured their arteries at the onset and one year after beginning pomegranate juice supplementation. In one year’s time, the participants reduced plaque in their carotid arteries by up to 30%. In the control group (not supplementing with pomegranate), plaque increased by 9%. Additionally, those supplementing with pomegranate reduced their blood pressure.

As if that wasn’t enough—there’s more to this unusual and hand-staining fruit. It has numerous benefits, and likely some yet undiscovered. Among those we know:

  • Pomegranate is a known antiviral and antibacterial agent, fighting common infections like Influenza, HIV, Hepatitis B, Salmonella, Candida, Bird Flu, E. Coli, Cholera, and SARS.
  • It can fight breast cancer cells: “phytochemicals derived from pomegranates have the ability to inhibit the proliferation of estrogen-responsive breast cancer cells in a laboratory setting.”

Pomegranate is in-season in colder months, so get the real thing whenever possible. When it’s not available fresh, look into an organic pomegranate juice to reap the benefits of this underappreciated berry.


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