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How Hollywood Distorts Self Image

Andre Evans
by
May 3rd, 2012
Updated 05/19/2013 at 7:41 pm
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bellypinch 220x137 How Hollywood Distorts Self Image

Today’s world largely exploits the insecurity of the average person, causing them to discard their own personal worth and pursue a false image of perfection. While this reality — brought upon by many ‘celebrity’ diets and trends sponsored by major corporations — finds its way into many aspects of humanity, there is something that can be done. Sadly this ‘less-than-perfect’ mindset also makes the affected individual question their physical appearance, personal worth, and can cause serious psychological issues.

Thereafter, they are driven to become what they have been told is what the average person should look like. It is this cycle that ultimately leads to binge dieting, anorexia, and impossible goals that eventually turn into huge letdowns.  This pursuit  to ‘physical perfect’ as portrayed by the media will always be fruitless, as most celebrity icons largely have his or her self image subjected to countless artificial modifications, ultimately resulting in something that scarcely represents the person themselves in physical appearance or otherwise.

Despite this, the extent to which people attempt to emulate like their idols has become more and more freakish and hazardous. Thousands of dollars go to body modification and surgery, artificially changing the appearance of the person to look closer to their manipulated image of beauty. Furthermore, millions are spent per year on dangerous diet pills and crash diet courses that serve to actually destroy your body from the inside.

Watching stars who appear to be successful to them from a glance, many people take to believing that they are less capable than their favorite stars. But as noted before, the images meant to represent these people are false and contrived, and belie the fact that these people are human beings just like you. In fact, many of them have fatal flaws that are not shown on the silver screen or in the tabloids. Behind the graphic design work, makeup, and professional stylists covering up any spot of imperfection, there is a real human being who you may not even recognize off-screen!

These people wake up every morning, and sleep every night. They have their own host of good qualities in addition to character flaws. They have their share of achievements as well as broken dreams. Despite this truth, people drive themselves to extreme lengths to replicate these fake ideals, images and values that do little for them or others around them.

When does it become questionable? When you are substituting your own opinions for another’s. When does it become dangerous? When you are compromising your values — or even your health — in a quest to become someone else. What does it mean? Some people take performance enhancing drugs to reach their perceived image of physical fitness. Others may exploit their body functions to artificially create weight loss. Some may contradict their own core values, in pursuit of a fleeting ambition that will ultimately amount to nothing.

One should hold to their individualism in a time where public opinion is largely sculpted and formed into something that holds no value whatsoever. The individual must be comfortable with themselves, as well as aware of their needs for improvement. Thus they can set goals that will articulate them forward in life, in contrast to seeking after vanities and fleeting pleasures. You are your own person, and you can establish yourself through independent ideals and values.

About Andre Evans:
Andre Evans has studied the connection between mind and body for the majority of his professional career, offering insights as to why we do the things that we do and how to change our lives for the better. Highlighting the extreme power of the mind and the numerous neurological reasons that you may be experiencing a health crisis, Andre breaks down exactly how to melt away your stress levels and enjoy your life the way you should -- naturally.

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