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A Vitamin D Deficiency Could be to Blame for Depressive Winter Months

Andre Evans
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November 15th, 2011
Updated 11/18/2012 at 10:30 am
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depressedman1 210x131 A Vitamin D Deficiency Could be to Blame for Depressive Winter Months

Into late autumn and winter, it seems as though the moods and dispositions of many people darken. Along with the days becoming shorter and with darkness creeping in earlier, people seem more reserved and often depressed.

Reasons for this mood alteration are said to range from a lack of sunlight, to a psychological disposition similar to that of animals, where since food becomes scarce, their activity is diminished. There is absolutely a psychological effect on a person when the sun isn’t as prominent and when days last for a shorter amount of time.

Along with the psychological impact, a chemical effect also plays a role. During the winter months, the sun features less prominently, and thus your body is not able to naturally synthesize the essential vitamin D. Alongside with its massive list of health benefits, including cancer prevention, vitamin D has also been linked to alleviating stress, anxiety, and depression.

The obvious link seems to be that since you receive less sunlight in the latter months, you are receiving less vitamin D, and thus it affects the average person’s physical and mental health accordingly. Numerous reports highlight the necessity of vitamin D, and how being deficient in it can lead to all forms of physical and mental disorders.

In winter, the earth is angled further away from the sun, and so it is much more difficult to gain vitamin D from direct sunlight exposure. So how do you receive the necessary amount of vitamin D? One of the prominent methods for treating SAD includes various forms of artificial light therapy. Using light therapy lamps and tanning beds can help the body artificially produce the vitamin D it would otherwise make in direct sunlight.

Another method to increase vitamin D levels would be to purchase quality vitamin D supplements for any time of the year since some people can’t take direct sunlight, and it takes large amounts of direct sunlight exposure alone to optimize your levels of vitamin D. If it critical that you know how to boost your vitamin D intake if you want to avoid illness and disease.

About Andre Evans:
Andre Evans has studied the connection between mind and body for the majority of his professional career, offering insights as to why we do the things that we do and how to change our lives for the better. Highlighting the extreme power of the mind and the numerous neurological reasons that you may be experiencing a health crisis, Andre breaks down exactly how to melt away your stress levels and enjoy your life the way you should -- naturally.

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  1. Jing Lang says:

    There is a false claim to this topic.

    Artificial UV light – sun bed – does not provide good Vitamin D, instead damages our cell, destroying our skin structure and causing more harm to our body system leading to a complete body break down – allowing diseases such as cancer.

    Sun light contains both UV and UVB, essentially important as it contains encoded information feeding naturally to our white cells, providing our body with a huge boost strengthening our immune system thus preventing any illnesses or heart diseases.

    The philosophy of Yin and Yang is another topic to be discuss..our heart ('Yang') has a strong relation to the Sun (also a 'Yang') and we need enough of sun light.

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